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Musings - The Great Scot Blog

CHOOSING A CLAN TARTAN THAT’S RIGHT FOR YOU – YOUR GUIDE 101 (3 min read)

CHOOSING A CLAN TARTAN THAT’S RIGHT FOR YOU – YOUR GUIDE 101 (3 min read)

3 min read

At Great Scot we work closely with Scotland’s finest mills to offer you over 1,000 tartans. We also work with the smallest mills to be able to offer you rare, ancient and ‘impossible to find’ tartans. So, so if you don’t see your tartan on our Tartan Finder, simply reach out to our Heritage Specialist here, who will be delighted to help you!   

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Hey's Bentley & it's Journey to Scotland

THE BENTLEY MARK VI FEATURED IN OUR IMAGES HAS AN INTRIGUING HISTORY

Built in 1949, the car was first owned by Wilson H Hey, a Surgeon who led a fascinating and controversial life.

Hey spent the First World War as a battlefield doctor with the Royal Army Medical Corps, in which he rose to the rank of Major. He was made a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour for his treatment of French casualties. However, his experiences there set him on a path which resulted in tabloid scandal and a criminal record.

 

After the Great War, Hey returned to his post of consultant at the Manchester Royal Infirmary, where he was a pioneer in using radium for the treatment of cancer. Time off was spent in the mountains, climbing regularly in Britain and the Alps. By 1939, Hey’s passion for the outdoors motivated him to campaign for the establishment of organised Mountain Rescue teams, and in particular the need for effective pain-relief for injuries sustained in the mountains. He could see a way to not only ease suffering but also to considerably boost the chances of the casualties' survival in extreme and remote conditions.

Frustrated by bureaucracy and red-tape, he decided to personally fund and supply the effective pain-killer, morphine to Mountain Rescue posts across the country. The problem however was that in the eyes of the law, this was highly illegal. The law strictly limited the use of this drug to hospitals only, although special dispensations were given to coalmines.

Hey was convinced that in order to force the government to revise the law, it was necessary to deliberately flout the rules. He had anticipated the possible legal proceedings that would follow, and felt that a high profile court case and a spell in jail would publicise the cause effectively. 

In 1949, he was summoned before the courts. Hey arrived in his Bentley knowing there was a chance he may not be making the return trip that day. In fact, he narrowly avoided prison, but garnered a large body of support from politicians, peers and leading figures from the Royal College of Surgeons.

As a result, in 1950 the law was changed. Non-medical members of mountain rescue teams could now hold and administer morphine, helping relieve suffering and ultimately, saving lives. 

Meanwhile, the Bentley had become a distinctive part of Hey’s household. Hey employed a driver, called ‘Reanie’, a stridently independent woman who was typically clad in stylish tweed trouser-suits. Reanie negotiated the official two-week Bentley Chauffeur course with Merit; of course, she had driven field ambulances during the war.

After Wilson Hey’s death in 1956, the Bentley passed to his engineer-son Thomas. He used the car as his daily motor and continental cruiser for the next 60 years, exhaustively and meticulously cataloguing every turn of screw and tighten of nut. 

Amongst other projects, Thomas Hey worked as an engineer developing flight-critical hydraulic systems for the famed ‘Vulcan', which at the time was Britain’s game-changing strategic nuclear bomber.

In his private time, the Bentley was Thomas's pride and joy. He used his scientific approach to devise ingenious solutions and improvements, such as it’s electronic car alarm and engine immobiliser which he designed and built at a time before pocket calculators even existed. It is doubtful that another Bentley exists anywhere in the world that has such a detailed and insightful service history!

In 2013 the vehicle moved through the family once again. The Bentley now resides in the care of Wilson’s grandson and Thomas’s nephew, Nick Lewtas, who lives in the beautiful Scottish Highlands.

Nick originally moved to Scotland in the early 70s to design commercial fish farms. One of his innovations was repurposing waste warm water from Scotch Whisky Distilleries to provide optimum growing conditions for the fish.

Nowadays he owns and runs a farm on Speyside, home to some of the world’s finest whiskies!  In his spare time, Nick is engaged in the rolling restoration of his Grandfather’s Bentley - making sure that it is fit and ready for the next 60 years!

GREAT SCOT TWEED INSPIRATION: GALLOWAY

Galloway: Rugged and magnificent – it is truly Scotland's Lands End!

Galloway inspirations

In a quiet corner of South-West lowland Scotland lies Galloway. It’s rocky, sandy coastline and lush green forests are the inspiration for our newest tweed. Ospreys nest and Kites soar above the bright yellow broom bushes and rich blue Solway Firth, whilst Red Squirrels dodge bluebells to scale the verdant beech trees. In August the wild heather blossoms and the landscape is adorned with ribbons of regal purple.

We’ve chosen our classic Lieutenant Jacket style and smart Regency Waistcoat to represent this beautiful cloth and the combination is timeless.

Great Scot Lieutenant Jacket in Galloway Tweed

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Great Scot Lady's Regency Waistcoat in Galloway Tweed

All the tweeds used in Great Scot styles are tailoring quality and of a weight that is highly suited to draping beautifully, whilst effortlessly maintaining the integrity of our highly structured silhouettes.

Due to the high quality, soft yarns that they are woven from, our tweeds feel soft against the skin and never scratchy or itchy.

We are highly particular in specifying that all the cloths we use are woven in family run mills throughout Great Britain.

Click here to learn more about the Great Scot Philosophy - It's Ethical.

GREAT SCOT TWEED INSPIRATION: GLENCOE

Glencoe: The Legendary Scottish Highland Valley Glencoe Tweed Inspiration

The jewel colours of this magical, historical setting have inspired our newest tweed.


We strived to capture for you, the eruption of colour that illuminate it's steep and craggy slopes every season.


Shades reminiscent of the vast population of fox, red and roe deer fuse effortlessly with opulent yellow gorse and Scottish primrose which from May onwards, bloom ceaselessly.

 Great Scot Glencoe Tweed Collection

When paired with our most flattering designs such as the Reiver and Lady Mary waistcoats and the Lady Mary Jacket, the Glencoe tweed is in its element.

Great Scot Reiver Waistcoat in Glencoe Tweed
Drama can be added by wearing the styles with black related separates; dress, skirt, jodh's or jeans – Our jet black Victorian Blouse is shown here with the neck tie on and bowed. - dash of red lipstick and VAVOOM!

 

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Great Scot Lady Mary Jacket in Glencoe Tweed

All the tweeds used in Great Scot styles are tailoring quality and of a weight that is highly suited to draping beautifully, whilst effortlessly maintaining the integrity of our highly structured silhouettes.

Due to the high quality, soft yarns that they are woven from, our tweeds feel soft against the skin and never scratchy or itchy.

We are highly particular in specifying that all the cloths we use are woven in family run mills throughout Great Britain.

Click here to learn more about the Great Scot Philosophy - It's Ethical.